Set Instructional Goals Using The Rubric Summary

In the blog, Using the CueThink Rubric, evaluating student work at a deeper level by analyzing the key skills within each phase was discussed. But the benefits of using the rubric don’t stop there.

The data from the CueThink Rubric is funneled into a Rubric Summary to present an aggregate of students’ scores. This view supports you in setting your next instructional goal and planning targeted instruction.

Navigate the Rubric Summary

The Rubric Summary is found under the Reports menu of Educator Mode. Scores from the the problem you most recently assessed are displayed in the Rubric Summary. You can see scores from previous problems by using the dropdown menu (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1: Rubric Summary displays scores of the most recently assessed problem.

Fig. 1: Rubric Summary displays scores of the most recently assessed problem.

In the center table, the number of noticing and wonderings students entered appears first. Then, the rest of the table displays how many students received a score of Yes, Partially, or Not Yet for each criterion of the rubric. Select the numbers in blue to view a list of students who received that score (Fig. 2).

To the right of the summary table, you can view student-specific notes and scores for each phase. Toggle between the phases or select Total to view students’ total score (Fig. 3).  

Fig. 2: Numbers in blue list students who received Yes, Partially, and Not Yet scores.

Fig. 2: Numbers in blue list students who received Yes, Partially, and Not Yet scores.

Fig. 3: Student-specific notes and scores for each phase.

Fig. 3: Student-specific notes and scores for each phase.

Select Your Next Goal

When you task students to solve a problem in CueThink, plan a problem-solving goal. This way, the Rubric Summary will help you identify how well students met your objective.

For example, if your focus is improving students’ written plan to contain a clear procedure and explanation, the breakdown of scores will help you determine your next goal. Such as:

  • If most of the class received scores of Partially or Not Yet, continue to strengthen students’ written plans.

  • If most of the class received scores of Yes, look at the criteria for a different phase for trends in the Partially and Not Yet scores to select your next instructional focus.  

Fig. 4: Phase-specific notes and Fig. 5: Student groupings

Fig. 4: Phase-specific notes and Fig. 5: Student groupings

Plan Your Next Steps

Once you identify your next goal, use phase-specific notes (Fig. 4) and student groupings (Fig. 5) to plan targeted instruction for small groups, or, for whole class instruction.

Let’s return to our written plan example, where most of the class received Partially or Not Yet scores. Do your notes indicate most students need to work on writing a plan? If so, then your next mini-lesson could be whole class instruction on how to write a plan. Using an exemplar plan and the Expectations for Written Plans resource, ask students to formulate criteria that should Always, Sometimes and Never be part of a written plan. Look at the list of students whose scores are Yes and your phase-specific notes to identify exemplar work. Using student work emphasizes peer-to-peer learning and saves you time.

Let’s Sum It Up

The Rubric Summary helps you identify class-wide trends and set your next problem-solving goal. You may find the need to select the same objective for a few problems to give students time and practice improving their skills. Additionally, it’s also not uncommon to revisit a goal a few months later as a refresher for students. The key is to provide students with direct instruction to improve their problem-solving process over time.

View the Learning Hub Unit on Introducing CueThink to students for tips on how to work with students on each phase.